Saxophonist Eldredge Jackson headlines All That Jazz event in Bartlesville


All That Jazz, an annual gala event of the Westside Community Center in Bartlesville, OK, will celebrate its 10th anniversary at 6 p.m. Saturday, February 18, at the Hillcrest Country Club (click here for map). This year’s musical lineup will feature the Mo Hemian Jazz Syndicate during dinner and, for the main entertainment, Tulsa jazz saxophonist Eldredge Jackson.

Jackson, a New Orleans-born saxophonist, who was raised in Tulsa, OK, has delighted audiences with his blend of traditional and smooth jazz peppered with a dash of gospel. Jackson has performed with a cross-section of urban jazz and R&B musicians such as Wayman Tisdale, Najee, Howard Hewett, Jeffrey Osborne, Angela Winbush, Stanley Jordan, Shirley Murdock, Con-Funk-Shun, Tom Braxton, and fellow Tulsans Charlie Wilson and The GAP Band.

Tax-deductible donations and proceeds from All That Jazz benefit the Westside Community Center’s youth programs. The Center has been a United Way agency since 1951. Today, the center focuses on uniting, nurturing and empowering local youth through programs such as the After School ZonePeaceful WarriorsSummer Enrichment, and Work Ethics (WE) Pro$per.

Tickets are $100 and include a raffle ticket for the evening’s showcased prizes. For more information and to purchase tickets, call the Westside Community Center at (918) 336-6760 or email Executive Director Morris McCorvey at westsidecommunityctr@juno.com and include “All That Jazz” in the subject line.

Steve Goforth and Covenant Brass performs Sunday at Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame

Steve Goforth

Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame presents Steve Goforth and Covenant Brass at 5 p.m. Sunday, July 31, 2011 at the Jazz Depot, 111 E First St. (Upper Level), Tulsa, OK. 
Trumpet and flugelhorn player Steve Goforth leads a brass quartet that not only plays jazz, but also performs classical and popular tunes. Goforth has played trumpet with the Bartlesville Symphony Orchestra since 2001 and has been a professor of jazz studies at Oklahoma Baptist University and Oklahoma City University. 
General admission is $15; $10 for seniors and students and free for kids under 12. Reservations at the front tables are also available for $20. For tickets and more information, call (918) 281-8609. Click here to order tickets online: http://www.myticketoffice.com/events.asp?id=11&searchtext=1892&expand=yes 

GNOTE to headline 9th annual All That Jazz Fundraiser on Feb. 19 in Bartlesville

GNOTE (from left): George Allen, Annette Peters and Toby Denton

GNOTE, a high energy trio that specializes in music from the 50s through today’s hits, will headline the 9th annual All That Jazz Fundraiser at 6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 19, 2011, at the Hillcrest Country Club, 1901 Price Road in Bartlesville, OK. Attendees will enjoy a reception featuring hors d’oeuvres and music by the Bartlesville High School Jazz Band at 6 p.m., dinner at 6:30 p.m., program at 7:45 p.m. and music by GNOTE from about 8:15-11:15 p.m. For ticket information, call (918) 336-6760.
GNOTE, consisting of group members George Allen, Annette Peters and Toby Denton, covers genres from R&B to country to rock-‘n’-roll to jazz as well as blues. Oklahoma Magazine selected the group as one of the Who’s Who of Oklahoma Entertainment in 2005.
All That Jazz is a fundraiser that supports the programs of the Westside Community Center (WCC) in Bartlesville. The Westside Community Center, founded in 1950 as a center for the black community, has enriched the lives of Bartlesville residents through the encouragement of self-motivation and self-reliance. The Westside Community Center also provides vital services and meets many needs that aren’t addressed by other local organizations. Although the center primarily serves minorities, low-income families, senior citizens and children who reside in the western sector of Bartlesville, membership is open to anyone who wishes to join and benefit from WCC programs.

Westside Community Center presents “All That Jazz” on Feb. 20 in Bartlesville

Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame inductee and Tulsa saxophonist Grady Nichols will perform at the Westside Community Center’s annual fundraiser “All That Jazz” at 8 p.m. Feb. 20 at the Hillcrest County Club, 1901 Price Road in Bartlesville, OK. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for dinner.
Nichols, best known for several CD releases including “Sophistication” and “Take Me with You,” presents a kaleidoscope of  smooth jazz, pop, adult contemporary and even a dance mix. “My influences are so varied and I try to reflect that in my music,” Nichols said. “As I’ve matured as a songwriter, that growth has allowed me to infuse more of myself into each record. Using this mixture of flavors has helped me to create a sound with widespread audience appeal. As a result, you’ll see people of all ages at my shows.”  
Nichols has collaborated with notable artists such as Grammy nominated producer and keyboardist Jeff Lorber, trumpeter Chris Botti, guitarist Paul Pesco, the late  bass guitarist Wayman Tisdale, producer Zac Maloy and Grammy nominated songwriter Toni Estes.
“All That Jazz” features Cajun-style cuisine and opening entertainment by the Bartlesville High School Jazz Band. A cash-bar is available, and door prizes (1 ticket per admission) will be given away.
Tickets are $100 and must be purchased in advance by calling the Westside Community Center at (918) 336-6760. Proceeds from “All That Jazz” benefit local community programs at the Westside Community Center, a United Way agency since 1951.

Theater Review: Jesus is a “Superstar” in Bartlesville


Broadway in Bartlesville continues its season with rock opera “Jesus Christ Superstar” at the Bartlesville Community Center, 300 S. Adams Blvd. Starring actor Ted Neeley as Jesus of Nazareth and newcomer James Delisco as Judas Iscariot, the opera centers on the political and interpersonal struggles of Judas Iscariot and Jesus. “Jesus Christ Superstar” is based on the canonical gospels’ accounts of the last week of Jesus’ life, beginning with Jesus and his followers arriving in Jerusalem and ending with the Crucifixion.
Jesus’ disciple (and later traitor) Judas Iscariot is the focus of most of the opera, as he struggles internally regarding his devotion to Jesus and his misgivings about the rising popularity of his ministry and its effect on the Pharisees and the Sadducees.
This is not just an ordinary production; “Jesus Christ Superstar” has a 21st century feel to it. A live orchestra played multi-layered musical arrangements, featuring rock and classical elements.
Neeley, who has worked with notables such as Bo Diddley, Keith Carradine and Meat Loaf, hits the high notes perfectly and precisely during Act One and Two. The self-explanatory storyline ends with the Crucifixion and the orchestral piece, “John 19:41” – “Now in the place where he was crucified there was a garden; and in the garden a new sepulchre, wherein was never man yet laid.”
I think most of the audience thought there was more to the story after Jesus ascended to heaven, but the lights came on, and cast members walked on stage for the final encore. Hearing one audience member say, “Oh, I guess it’s over. We should stand” was an indicator that although the play was good, a flawless finish would not leave those in suspense.
However, it is awesome that Broadway productions do cater to the smaller market. The appreciation for arts in Bartlesville was certainly there.