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Veracity Entertainment scores two No. 1 hits and inks deal with Kobalt Music Group

Ted Winn – Photo provided

Singer/songwriter Ted Winn’s Veracity Entertainment music administration company continues to make great new strides in the urban and gospel music genres. This week, Rev. Charles Jenkins & Fellowship Chicago sit at #1 on Billboard’s Hot Gospel Songs chart with the soul-stirring song of praise, “Awesome.” Last week, R&B star Tank scored a No. 1 Adult R&B hit with “Next Breath” – the second No. 1 of his career and his first since “Please, Don’t Go” in 2007. Both tunes are written by Veracity composers.
 
Recently, Veracity partnered with Kobalt Music Group for the London-based firm to sub-administer Veracity’s copyrights internationally. With over 175,000 copyrights under its jurisdiction, it’s the leading independent music publisher in the world and collects royalties from 33 territories worldwide. Some of its leading writers include Beck, Bon Iver, Kelly Clarkson, Gotye, LMFAO and Lionel Richie.
 
Veracity was established in 2005 by Nasceas Timms and Ted Winn, whom has made a name for himself as a gospel singer over the last dozen years with Top Ten hits such as “The Lifter” and “God Believes in You.” He began his career as half of the Stellar Award winning duo, Ted & Sheri, which is best known for their signature songs, “Come Ye Disconsolate” and “Celebrate.”
 
Veracity is a multi-faceted firm that serves the needs of writers, producers and independent recording labels. Among its services are song administration, copyright registration, licensing, contract negotiation and royalty collection. Winn launched the company when he had trouble receiving accurate royalty accountings for his own copyrights. Eventually, his fellow performers began to ask him to investigate their missing royalties and the word soon spread to the point that Winn decided to officially hang out his shingle and make this service a second career.
 
Through Veracity, Winn manages the career of tunesmith David Balfour who’s written songs for Anthony Hamilton, Marques Houston and T-Pain’s platinum smash, “Can’t Believe It.” He also manages Christopher ‘C4’ Umana, who has written and produced songs such as Musiq’s “Radio,” Kelly Rowland’s “Keep It Between Us” and Tank’s big comeback smash, “Next Breath.” Veracity writers have written songs recorded by Robin Thicke, Toni Braxton, TLC, Syleenda Johnson, Bishop T.D. Jakes, Jonathan Nelson, Juanita Bynum, among others. Among recent smashes are the No. 1 gospel hits Earnest Pugh’s “I Need Your Glory” and Vashawn Mitchell’s “Nobody Greater” that won a Stellar Award as song of the year this past January. For more information, go to veracityentertainment.com.

Artists come together for ‘Amazing Grace’ documentary

Written over 200 years ago in Olney, England, “Amazing Grace” is the world’s most renowned hymn and has been recorded by a who’s who of contemporary music. On May 8, 2012, BBC Radio 2, the United Kingdom’s most listened to radio station, will broadcast an original documentary celebrating the song and its controversial history. It airs at 10 p.m. London Time (5 p.m. EST/2 p.m. PST in the USA) and can be heard on www.bbc.co.uk (http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01h5xfy).

Grammy Award nominated soul singer Candi Staton narrates the incredible journey of the song’s composer John Newton, from 18th century slave trader to evangelical preacher and abolitionist. She also charts the song’s recording history and revisits classic recordings from the worlds of gospel (Aretha Franklin, Mahalia Jackson, Al Green), folk (Pete Seeger, Judy Collins) and pop (Elvis Presley, Sam Cooke, Royal Scots Dragoon Guards).

The program features a rare interview with the legendary 93-year-old Pete Seeger, as well as fresh reflections on the song’s impact from artists who have recorded it such as folk’s leading lady Judy Collins, Jimmy Carter of The Blind Boys of Alabama, Tramaine Hawkins, organist Moses Tyson Jr., Beverly Knight, Basil Meade of the London Gospel Choir, platinum-selling Contemporary Christian artist Sandi Patty, and new generation gospel artist Bryan Wilson, who recently released to iTunes and Amazon MP3, “Grace, It’s Amazing”, a reggae-folk flavored tune that is loosely based on the old hymn. Others such as journalist Steve Turner; author Anthony Heilbut (“The Gospel Sound”); the British Ambassador of Soul, David Nathan; scholar Adam Hochschild and Archbishop Carl Bean also provide commentary on the song and its illustrious legacy.

Candi Staton is famed for her 1970s hits such as “In the Ghetto” and “Young Hearts Run Free”. She’s remained current over the last two decades with critically-acclaimed CDs such as “His Hands” (2006), her platinum party favorite “You Got the Love” and last year’s Triple A #1 smash, “Kandi”, with the British band, one Eskimo. Alex Feldman for Pixiu Productions produced the special.



Family welcomes long-lost relative


British author Hannah Pool pens a prolific tale of reuniting with her birth family in Eritrea, a war-town African country. Pool was adopted from an Eritrean orphanage by a white couple. “My Fathers’ Daughter” (Simon and Schuster, $25) is profound because Pool doesn’t just share typical details, but she reveals her innermost thoughts as well as her impression of newfound relatives who sought her out. Not only was Pool brave, but she seems fearless in nature. She illustrates this by spending a few days with her family and other relatives in Asmara, but she leaves her comfort zone and returns to Keren, her birthplace and where her mother died. 

Pool feels comfortable by her audience and exposes them to every detail of her journey. After the book ended, I wanted to know more. Has she returned to visit her family? But the most we know is that she is a beauty editor for The Guardian newspaper, and she is an independent Londoner.